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Why historians should write fiction

History certainly comes alive for me when an historian or author can explain the why in depth rather than the how. Why I should care about any of the people involved. History at its very best makes that vital connection showing people’s motivations and actions of the past still strongly relate to modern society.

Novel approaches

ARTICLE

 Ian Mortimer

“Your book reads like a novel,” is a comment that popular historians often hear. When said by a general reader, it is a compliment: an acknowledgement of the fluency of the writing and a compelling story. If a historian uses those same words, however, it is an insult. It means ‘you cannot be trusted on your facts’. Hence the title of this piece is bound to infuriate every reader of this journal, for it implies that historians should tell lies. After all, that is what novelists do, isn’t it? Make it all up if they don’t know the facts?

I ought to explain at the outset that I am a novelist (James Forrester) as well as a historian (Ian Mortimer), and I write history for the mass market as well as scholarly articles. As a novelist, I tell lies. Whoppers. All historical novelists do. In my…

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Historical Novels And Learning From The Past, by Paul Dowswell

I agree with many of the points. History itself is far stranger than most fiction could ever hope to be. I do differ, though, with the author’s argument that we only look to history to prevent the bad stuff from happening again. We should also be inspired by history for all the good and positive changes over our history and people who brought those changes about.